News


2020 Legislative Session: week 6

It was a busy week of floor action at the State Capitol. Wednesday night was the House of Origin cutoff which means that all bills not necessary to implement the budget (NTIB) must be voted out of their original legislative chamber or they would no longer be viable. Bills that were voted out prior to cutoff will have hearings in the opposite chambers until the next policy cutoff on Friday, Feb. 28.


2020 Legislative Town Halls

Attend your legislators’ Town Hall meetings and advocate for School Nurse Corps funding and other nursing priorities. It’s a great opportunity to hear directly from your legislators.


WSNA opposes the Nurse Licensure Compact, SB 6209

The Washington State Nurses Association is committed to supporting nurses and reducing barriers to licensure, especially for military spouses and partners. However, WSNA does not support the NLC.



2020 Legislative Session Week 4

What a week! WSNA nurses were at the Capitol this week – advocating for nursing priorities and working families. On Thursday, nurses from around the state joined WSNA’s Lobby Day and spoke with their legislators on our priority issues.



FAQ on Novel Coronavirus (02/04/20)

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that usually only cause mild respiratory disease, like the common cold. Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat, and general feeling of illness. At this time, it is has not reached epidemic or pandemic status.



Nurses Climate Challenge: Educating 50,000 Health Professionals by 2022

To activate nurses, the Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments and Health Care Without Harm launched the Nurses Climate Challenge in May 2018, a national campaign to educate health professionals on climate and health. We are aiming to educate 50,000 health professionals by 2022.


You're thinking of retiring...

Nurses about to enter into a new chapter of their life­ — retirement — often have questions about options for licensure renewal and continuing their membership in WSNA.


What does professional activism look like?

Professional activism is the engagement of skilled and competent professionals utilizing strategic campaigning to achieve a goal. In nursing, it is nurses coming together to assess a need and identify the problem, design and implement a plan to address the issue, evaluate that plan, and repeat until the problem is solved.



ANA launches new podcast

On Jan. 27, the American Nurses Association launched a new podcast series in partnership with Johnson & Johnson entitled SEE YOU NOW.



2020 Legislative Session week 2

It was a busy week of hearings in Olympia, with WSNA weighing in on many bills. We continued meeting with legislators about our priority issues, including funding for the School Nurse Corps. This week we are highlighting movement on our policy priority related to the need for a more uniform, but also community-based, response system for sexual assaults and making sure that the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners we represent are included in conversations that affect their work.




2020 Legislative Session Week 1

2020 Legislative Session Week 1 update The 2020 legislative session kicked off on Monday. It’s the second year of the biennium which means that it is a “short” 60-day session. New House Speaker Laurie Jinkins was sworn in on Monday – she is the first woman and first out lesbian Speaker of House. She is a strong advocate for access to health care, public health, as well as nursing and patient safety issues. Former Speaker Frank Chopp remains a member of the House of Representatives and is now sitting on several committees including House Health Care.


WSNA, UFCW 21 Support Providence Swedish workers

The Washington State Nurses Association and UFCW 21 fully support Swedish workers represented by SEIU Healthcare 1199NW as they serve 10-day notice to the hospital of their intention to strike for patient care and safety at multiple campuses.












The truth about Providence Sacred Heart

When you see stories about Sacred Heart, we want you to ask yourself a simple question: “Who should I trust—the nurses in my community or a corporate PR department in Seattle?”